Modifying the circuit for better Vpp control

Planning:

I needed finer control of Vpp.  Since this is an experimental design, I decided to make some calculated guesses to choose the right values.

To start with, I believe that putting a resistor between the emitter and ground of the feedback transistor will limit the gain of the transistor.  The voltage of this resistor will rise as the current through it increases limiting the current gain of the circuit.  The first guess I tried was calculating the resistor as if the transistor wasn’t there(same as fully saturated) for my max voltage (25 V).

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Component analysis (Hardware V00G)

Last week, the voltage boost circuit would barely get above 12 volts.  This would work for most devices but I had set my goal at around 20v. I rechecked datasheets to verify I wasn’t operating out of specification.

Diode D1: The voltage across this diode is really close to 12V when Q5 is on and C14 is charged. From the datasheet, the reverse breakdown voltage(Vr) for and SD103 is 40 V.  This is a fast switching Schottky diode. This is probably not my problem.

FET Q5: The voltage across the drain to source will also reach around 13 Volts when in the off phase of the pulse stream.  The drain to source breakdown voltage is 50 V. This transistor can switch fast enough even at 80MHz.  This is probably not my problem.

Resistor R5: I chose to use 100 Ohms when I populated the PCB.  I am definitely seeing a voltage drop at C17 when driving to around 12 Volts.  If this is the problem, I will not even be able to get to 12V when running on the lithium cell. I think this is causing the problem.

To test this, I decided to change the resistor to 47 Ohms and redo my testing.

I tested with a prescaler of 0, 1, 2, and 4.  With a prescaler of 4 I got 20 volts with the duty set to 51.

Analysis and testing revealed that the filter resistor R5 was too much resistance.  By changing it’s value to 47 Ohms, I was able to get the circuit operating the way I wanted.

I made no changes to the software other than changing the prescaler.  For this firmware, that is a value that I expect to be played with, so no firmware upload this week.  I did change the value of resistor R5 to 47 Ohms.  So I uploaded a new version of the hardware to GitHub.

I would like to see smaller steps between voltages, I am thinking of changing the inductor to a smaller value to improve efficiency and control.  I am not sure this works, but it might be worth a try.

I am still working in an area of electronics I don’t understand very well.  This is the first time for me to design a switching voltage boost circuit.  Do you have any suggestions of how to do it better? How about stories about your own experience with switching power supplies.

Sigma Delta still causing resets.

When I first built this revision of PCB, the board would reboot a lot.  That turned out to be the mis-wiring of the SPI RAM.  Part of that process in trouble shooting that board, I had guessed that I had a noisy power connection to the Wi-Fi module. So one thing that I had tried was adding a large reservoir capacitor and a small filter capacitor near the power pins of the module. Unless I am drawing too much current from the voltage regulator, this should eliminate any possible power issues.

This means my first test is to measure how much current is being drawn from the voltage regulator.  To do that I removed the jumper that bypassed the lithium cell charger and attached 3.7V to the PCB from a bench power supply.  To do this I removed all the test pins I had soldered to the module and soldered one to +BATT and another one to GND.  I connected my meter in series with the power supply and turned it all back on.  I measured the current consumed between 75 and 80 mA for the whole range of 0 to 99 prescaler.  This measurement was made with the radio inactive.

I think I can rule out the power supply as my problem.  Next I decided to change the software to take steps of 10 instead of 1 for adjusting the prescaler.  If the failure is because of an accumulated error, this should happen later and I should be able to get a number larger than 100 without a failure. I re-soldered the  bypass of the Lithium Cell charger and uploaded the change. I got to 91 No Failure. At 101 it still failed.  I change the step to 30 and when I got to 120, I got a reset cause:2. (maybe there is a clue here, This means external reset.)  I found this in the 2c-ESP8266_SDK_Programming Guide.pdf file from the Espressif BBS.

There are two pins on the module that can be used for external reset.  Since the serial to usb bridge is controlling the reset line, I decided to look into the EN pin first. It looked good with the right resistor in place to pull it up.  I then started looking through the code to make sure the Sigma Delta was configured to the correct pin.  Turns out that it wasn’t configured to output on any pin.  There was a missing statement in the code setting pin4 to output the sigma delta channel.  I added that line back in, saved, recompiled, uploaded and tested again. It still is failing.

Going back to the external reset, I decided to put lower value pullup resistors on the reset lines. I changed them from 10 K to 1 K.  This should reduce any affect of noise on the pins and still not draw too much current when pulled low. It still fails in the same way.  I have another project where the sigma delta is working very well.  The main difference I can see is that on this project I am reading the sigma delta twice before I write to it. In my other project, it reads the register once.  So I am going to make a simple uint8 variable to retain the value I am writing to the Sigma Delta prescaler.

It is still not fixed.  Have you seen this problem? Have you solved it?

 

 

Making, Hacking, and or Engineering.

I am waiting for PCBs to come in and hardware testing is next on my agenda for the design. So, I wanted to explore the differences of Making, Hacking, and Engineering.

Dictionary.com Definitions:

Making:

1. the act of a person or thing that makes:

The making of a violin requires great skill.

Hacking:

8. Informal. to make use of a tip, trick, or efficient method for doing or managing (something): to hack a classic recipe;

to hack your weekend with healthy habits.

Engineering:
1. the art or science of making practical application of the knowledge of pure sciences, as physics or chemistry, as in the construction of engines, bridges, buildings, mines, ships, and chemical plants.
I of course picked the definitions relevant to this blog. Making requires skill but doesn’t necessarily have to be clever.  Hacking as used in the term “life hack” are clever or unusual ways of doing something efficiently.  Then finally Engineering is applying known science to a given goal. As an electronics designer, you are usually working in a blend of all three ways.
A few days ago, I did a little project that was basically all Making.  I wanted an inline set of controls for a wired headset that I already own. I looked up the requirements online, designed the schematic, and PCB layout and ordered PCBs.  I really didn’t do much engineering and it wasn’t particularly clever.
When designing something that has never been done before, Engineering is great, but sometimes falls flat. Perhaps the design hasn’t been done because no one has found a clever solution yet. An engineer has to be careful when they incorporate a hack into their design.  Often clever solutions have unforeseen drawbacks that may not become apparent until thousands of units have been produced.
Sometimes a design hasn’t been done because no one has seen the need for it before.  This is often a nearly pure engineering process. Nothing in the design is hard to do, but you have to know the science(or it’s shortcuts) to complete the design.
Side note: In some cultures Engineering is about individual and public safety. An Engineer’s job is to make sure a product or design won’t hurt someone. Although I think it is important to always be thinking about safety in your design, this is not part of this discussion.
Side Note: Scientific shortcuts speed up the design process.  For instance we know the left hand rule for figuring out the magnetic polarity of a coil given it’s direction of current flow.
Do you have any favorite science shortcuts? Are you a maker, a hacker, or an engineer?  Is there another way to look at creating something that you’d like to talk about?

Code Cleanup and Boost Circuit testing (Firmware V00E)

This week I was reading through the SDK documentation, and realized a better way of handling serial events.  I was setting a flag and using a software timer to handle those events once a second. I also found that there is a webserver example in the IOT example.  I think this server is much simpler than ESP Ginx.  I have decided to try to use this example to move forward in the design

I decided to set up an OS task that I can post to that will do things like display the serial menu.  I am already using a task for serial handling.  (I grabbed it from an example and modified it for my uses).

I started by changing the UART task to a more generic task. I changed uart_recvTask to taskHandler. Then I just call an os_event_post with the action I want taken.  This allows the system to decide when to start the action. Displaying the menu and other tasks will generally happen faster this way.

As soon as I tried to do anything with GPIO16, I got lots of reboots.  It seems that the problems I was having with the Voltage boost circuit may have actually been GPIO16 problems. I have moved the control pin from GPIO16 to GPIO13 for enabling the voltage boost circuit.  With GPIO13 connected to the base of Q4 to enable/disable the boost circuit, the firmware booted and worked reliably.  After that I changed the filter resistor back to 10 Ohms as I had originally specified. And… It didn’t boot.

I replaced the 10 Ohm resistor with a 100 Ohm Resistor.  Still wouldn’t boot. I found that if I could get Q4 turned off, then the system would boot and run reliably.  As soon as I turned Q4 back on, the system would reboot and hang. So I tried adding a 100 μF between +BATT and GND to try to filter any electrical noise. It didn’t work.

I connected a bench power supply set at 3.3V to the boost circuit input, and I got it to partially work. I got 8 volts out of it for a few seconds.  I reinserted the GPIO16 initialization functions and no problems when no power is connected to the boost circuit.

I added some code that allows me to increment or decrement the prescaler using + and – keys respectively. When I hit the – key when the prescaler was at 0 to get to 255, it would reboot. When I hit the + key to go from 99 to 100 it would reboot.  So for now the prescaler is limited to the range of 0 to 99.

I am encouraged by getting the voltage on VPP higher than any supply voltage on the board. It appears that I need to create a separate ground plane just for the boost circuit.  If I couple it to the main ground with a low value inductor, I might be able to eliminate the problems it has caused.  I have uploaded the new version of the code. It still has very little commenting, however, I think it is cleaner and easier to read.

Debugging

I got the Sigma Delta putting out a waveform that I was looking for. But when I connected the power rail to the input of the inductor for voltage boost, the system stopped booting correctly.

I had several possible problems to look at.

GPIO16 is tied to reset on some ESP8266 modules allowing wake from deep sleep based on the RTC. I tried taking it back out of the code and I am still getting unexpected boot up activity. Doesn’t appear to be the problem, I may have to come back and have another look.

I haven’t built with the change of memory maps until last week. The bootloader may not be linking properly with my code or I may have made some mistakes pertinent to the linker. I removed the new files and recompiled without GPIO16 support and therefore a smaller memory map that fits without modification of the link files. I commented out most of the code and it still would not boot into my code. Code doesn’t appear to be the problem.

Finally, the boost circuit may draw very large amounts of current that will cause noise back into the rest of the system.  Power may not be stable enough for reliable operation. I disconnected the 5V from the boost circuit and got reliable boot.  I need the boost circuit to work, so I replaced the 10 ohm resistor with a 68 ohm resistor( Maximum current draw from USB would be 5v/68Ohms or 74mA). It wasn’t enough. So I tried 220 Ohms, then I tried 1KOhms.  This means the maximum current I can provide to VPP is significantly reduced.  I will add capacitance to the PCB on the 5V lines to allow for better noise immunity. The board is booting reliably.  The problems I had earlier with the CH340G were probably related to this problem as well.  I still needed to run the CH340G at 3.3V, So I am glad I changed that already.

The boost circuit is not able to create a voltage above 5v with the 1K resistor. Testing the ADC reading, I discovered I had R8 and R9 Cross labelled on the board. So I switched the labels on the layout.

The firmware is running again.  I can put a pulse stream out to the Voltage Boost circuit but the 1K limiting resistor is too large to work correctly.

 

Experience and Heuristic method

Experience gives us a better chance at guessing solutions to a problem.

For instance a 220 Ohm resistor is a good rule of thumb for an LED current Limiting resistor in a 5 volt circuit.  A simple guess for a 10 volt circuit would be to just double the resistance to around 440 ohms.  Unfortunately this will probably burn out the LED.  From experience of doing the calculations, you would recognize that a 1000 ohm resistor usually works well in a 10 volt circuit.

Heuristic method comes in to play when you are working in an area that you are less experienced in.  You look at how similar operating circuits have worked in the past and make an educated guess to design the new circuit. Sometimes you just make a guess and then test, even with no reasoning as why that guess would work.

So if you are a tinkerer or an engineering student, go get some experience. Go build some circuits, make some changes, break something, then try to fix it or maybe improve it.